X-Tip Anesthesia System

November 12, 2018

 

“Hey doc, is this root canal going to hurt?” is one of the most common questions I get every day. And the bar for root canal therapy is so low that it only takes a small amount to exceed your patient’s expectations.

 

That big fear comes from obtaining proper anesthesia, so there is no sensation during any part of the root canal. The hardest tooth to achieve this level of anesthesia is the hot mandibular molar. This level of irreversible pulpitis can be difficult to overcome using traditional anesthesia techniques.

 

I always start off my lower blocks with the inferior alveolar nerve block. This anesthesia delivery can be unpredictable at best. After application of the anesthesia, I wait approximately 10 to 15 minutes as I check on another patient. Then, I go back and ask if the patient is feeling signs of the anesthetic on their tongue and lips. If they are having those signs, I do one last check with Endo Ice to make sure there are no sensations within the tooth. If nothing, I will proceed; if they are feeling cold, in some cases I will decide to give an intraosseous injection.

 

The first time I used this type of anesthesia, I found I had poor results, and I was going to return the product. When I actually found out how to use the instrument properly, it worked like a charm, and it was quick!

 

First, you must inject distal to the tooth in question and within bone. You also should be in attached gingiva. Using a slow speed, you drill the cannula into the bone, and then use a hemostat to remove the insertion device, allowing only the sleeve to remain in the bone. At that time, use the short needle provided with the kit and inject anesthesia into the bone.

 

The key here is to obtain secured back pressure. When doing so, your success rate will go above 95% clinically. It’s quick and easy after the initial learning curve, and your patients will thank you for a pain-free root canal afterwards.

 

Click here for more information on X-Tip Anesthesia Systemcara Print 4.0 3-D Printer

General dentists are performing many procedures traditionally done by specialists. Clear aligner therapy can be a great adjunct to the general practice. Read next review >>>

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